Entries in restoration hardware (5)

Thursday
Oct042012

devyn, i love you

Ole' Resto has done some whack stuff over the last couple of years. But this lovely, the Devyn Tufted Daybed, is making up for all that. A daybed never has to work too hard to win me over. Current number in the Austin personal inventory: five. Yes, that's right, five! Admittedly one is in storage. Four of our daybeds are on full active duty. Why do I love a daybed?

1. It's a sofa AND a bed.

2. More comfortable to sleep (or sit) on than most pull out sofas.

3. Endless opportunities for pillow design and styling.

4. Amazing for kids' rooms (since they are also great to hang out and laze around on).

5. Perf. for a home office that needs to accommodate occasional overnighters.

6. So cozy for a family room/TV room, since everyone can snuggle up (and so much more chic than a sectional).

7. Little known fact: also perfect as spot for packing suitcases: enough room to open the suitcase and layout all the clothes you need around it so you can make your final packing decisions.

Devyn is all these things and so much more thanks to the luscious tufting, the swooping arms that make it wing chair-like (another of my loves), and it comes in Sand linen and Fog velvet -- yum and yum. And last but not least, please take a moment to enjoy the unbelievable styling of those bed linens! We are def having a loose styling moment when it comes to beds. The keen creative squad at RH were no doubt trying to make this thing seem a little more 'tween/teen by styling it louche and relaxed (hello headphones). It's dreamy. When I transform one of our daybeds into sleeping mode I usually skip the putting onof sheets and such. Instead, I either fold a large queen duvet in half lengthwise like a luxurious sleeping bag or I just put one full duvet on the bottom and one on top and then add sleeping pillows. It's way less fuss to make and then to wisk away the next day.

Imagine how different Devyn would look with snug-fitting plum velvet mattress cover and a mess of velvet cushions. Or tweeds and tartans. Or ombré linens. Or a tumble of kilim and suzani cushions...honestly, the possibilities! (see no. 3 above).

RH, welcome back. All is forgiven (well, maybe not quite ALL...but close).

Wednesday
Feb022011

restoration hardware does it again

This is called the Aviator Wing Desk. It is ridiculous. And poor Arne Jacobsen is rolling over in his grave over that chair - it's no swan.

Saturday
Apr172010

current obsession: rope

I braided hemp twine to make this tieback, then paired it with ready-made tassels.

For a shoot last week I borrowed one of those glass lamps that you can put things inside like this one. Love when an object offers you an option to take it to the next level with some styling. Anyhoo, I went to Lowe's and had a two-foot length of rope cut to put inside the lamp. The dude who cut it was completely baffled by my request: "What are you going to do with this?" My reply: "I'm going to put it inside a glass lamp. It also looks great coiled inside a vase." He looked at me like I had two heads! The rope cost $1.97. You can't beat that price for a little decorative oompf. I'd credit Kelly Hoppen for introducing me to the idea of a coil of rope as a decorative flourish. I find it both ridiculous and gorgeous. Clearly the dude at Lowe's thought only the former. Well, I'm here today to admit I am quite obsessed with rope and have been for a while.

It all started about 3 years ago when I became determined to install a rope stair rail in my place in Tweed. 

top 2 photos: donna griffith

The back stairs off the kitchen were a real deal-clincher when we bought this place, and from the beginning I was determined to make them a feature. Off came the beige carpet. On went 2 coats of Farrow & Ball Pointing floor paint. Then it was time for the rail. I went straight to boating supply places in Toronto to get the rope -- natural sisal and about 2in thick. I also went with boating hardware to hold the rail in place. The guys who helped me out with the products were fascinated by the idea of what I was doing and really helped me out. Sometimes design is like that -- a great adventure that you can take a few people along on. Love that. So when it came to installation time I knew exactly who to call -- my Dad. He was in the naval reserve as a young man. When I was little I used to play dress-up with the hat from his uniform. He learned to sew (repairing sails) and of course all the knots in the navy. And despite the years that have passed since, hasn't forgotten these skills. He's the one responsible for the very carefully lashed loop you see in the photo above. He's meticulous and I love him for it. The rope ends in a gorgeous coil on the upstairs landing. I'll definitely be getting a shot of it when we shoot the place for STYLE AT HOME in a few months. I have since found a site devoted entirely to stair ropes. It's called stairropes.com (of course). They have the MOST amazing stuff. Here's a selection.

 

6 photos above: stairropes.com

But rope rails aren't the only way to decorate with rope. There are so many more options. The key is restraint. Rope accessories are best handled like animal print ones -- a room can only handle one or two pieces. Any more and you get into gimiicky-themey territory and it all goes wrong. But how to choose...

sources: 1. rope chandleier, VandM. 2. cat's paw door stop, Ballard Designs (and a million other places). 3.rope-wrapped lamp, marthastewart.com. 4.vignette by steven gambrel. 5. room with rope candelier by steven gambrel. 6.& 7. neckalce and bracelet, anthropologie. 8.& 9. rope sconce and rope pouffe by christien meindertsma via thomas eyck. 10. long rope mirror, VandM. 11. round rope mirror, restoration hardware. 12. rope mat, stairropes.com